Lower Extremity Jump-Landing Biomechanics After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with Quadriceps Tendon Versus Patellar Tendon Autografts

Student: Hannah Collins

Major: Exercise Science

Mentors: Dr. Kate Pfile

Department: Education, Health, and Human Performance

Lower Extremity Jump-Landing Biomechanics After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction with Quadriceps Tendon Versus Patellar Tendon Autografts

Sixty-six percent of all sports-related injuries occur to the legs, with the knee being the most commonly injured joint. Injury to a significant knee joint structure, the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), affects nearly 250,000 people annually in the United States alone. Treatment typically includes surgery to repair the injured ACL, followed by rehabilitation. Surgeons may perform the surgery using a longstanding technique taking tissue from below the kneecap, the patellar tendon (PT), or elect a newer technique taking tissue from the front thigh muscles, the quadriceps tendon (QT). Restoring movement patterns for walking, jumping, and landing are key aspects of post-surgery rehabilitation and resuming physical activity. The purpose of this study was to compare jump-landing movement patterns between participants who received either the PT or QT ACL surgery and rehabilitation. Data points, such as joint angles and forces, were previously collected on 24 physically active participants who had ACL surgery (10 PT, 14 QT) and completed rehabilitation. In comparing PT and QT grafts, there were no statistically significant differences between the group demographics and the limb symmetry indexes (LSI) of the dependent variables. Limb symmetry index is calculated using the involved and uninvolved limb and can be used to help categorize the degree of symmetry or asymmetry between an individual's limbs. In the context of this study, LSI was assessed as a possible determiner of any major distinctions between graft types. Based on the results, the QT and PT grafts demonstrate similar landing patterns for knee and hip movement and lower extremity force absorption. In other words, it can be concluded that the QT graft is a viable alternate graft source for ACL surgeries.